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Engaging customers

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MOTION

We create everything from engaging keynotes to full product videos – bringing your brand to life.


PRINT

Our solid knowledge of  print-ready artwork means we can support your business with every handshake, meal choice and product decision.


ONLINE

We create responsive websites and web apps that look and feel beautiful whether viewed on your desktop, tablet or mobile device.


BRANDING

Whether creating your corporate identity, refining your brand or defining your proposition, we’ve got all angles covered.


DESIGN

Clever creative and detailed graphic design work to ensure your next marketing campaign hits its target audience.


UI/UX

From simple apps to engaging websites, our user experience / user interface expertise are key to your next project.


From the blog

Thoughts on Open Source and UI / UX

After an inspirational few days at the Software Freedom Day in Mumbai and Hamara conference in Pune, I got into some very interesting discussions with some incredible people, which truly changed my view on open source software. One such person was the inspiring Krishnakant Mane – an entrepreneur who has helped to develop many projects, runs his own GNUKhata, works at the Indian Institute for Technology, gives talks on objects around the world, and happens to be blind. You can watch his TEDx Talk here. So as a confessed ‘Mac Daddy’, I’d like to offer a bit on my background and my views on how we can contribute further to Hamara and open source projects to help grow the communities. Like a large percent of the population, I grew up using PCs from school, the model was that if you use a computer, the only option in schools is a PC running Windows. It wasn’t until leaving school and furthering my interest in graphic design, I discovered the iMac. Apple have been innovators in a lot of areas (though, they have stolen a lot of ideas too – Xerox are one of the main originators in question!), but one thing they really picked up on is packaging it for the average consumer. Typically in the early days, computers were created, owned and used by people who could build and develop them. The parts were sold separately and the user would build them themselves, tweaking and refining to suit their own purpose, often with just a bespoke wooden or plastic box to contain them. Steve Jobs had a passion for computers looking as aesthetically pleasing on the inside as they are on... read more

G is for Graphic Design

Main image – one of our projects for Jaguar Heritage – using the tail fin of the D-type to form the 60 to graphically link them. The art of layout and graphic design is as old as art itself – maybe even older. Daubs of paint or branches laid on the floor for way finding dates back thousands of years, and while techniques have changed, the basic premise is the same – to inform, visually. And these days a digital graphic design agency encompasses many things – brand, marketing, online, UI and UX, motion – all joined together with principles of layout, colour and text to convey a message. To design a poster you need to have a clear vision of what the message is, who it is aimed at and how you will compel the viewer to act on it, and the same can be said for any design medium, it is to generate an impulse – a ‘call to action’. It’s no good using an image of a fox to sell a car, unless the model is a Fox – context is one of the most important things to get right, but that said, sometimes something out of the ordinary is used to knock the target audience off-track, a technique in advertising called ‘relative abruption’. If you see a large red sign saying stop, you’ll likely act on it. Likely too, if you saw a huge orange sign saying ‘juice’ you might start feeling thirsty. Once the audience is drawn in on your headline and hero image, the next step is hierarchy. What do they need to... read more

F is for Fonts

Fonts, or to be more accurate, typefaces, are one of the key factors in a brand – and indeed for some brands they are so synonymous with it that the typeface alone can be enough to deliver a branded message. To be clear; a typeface is the look and feel of the characters themselves, and a font describes a group of such characters such as 12pt; or what weight they are, for example bold. Though to be honest, these days, the terms are interchangeable. The fact that ‘characters’ of a type’face’ are humanised by name, they do indeed embody just that. They convey emotion and expression, so it’s very important that we choose the right one when working on brand development to ensure it fits the ethos and character of the company. A funeral director business would look very strange set in Comic Sans for example – a cheap feeling, ‘friendly’ typeface which to be honest only really works well in an children’s book, yet it is the go-to typeface for many an office worker for their internal ‘please wash up your mugs’ signs. A serious, annoyed message written in a font that would be best describing what shades of the rainbow the unicorn is painted in to a 4 year old. In fact, there is such outrage over Comic Sans in the design industry, multiple websites and campaigns have sprung up to rid the world of the typeface! Whilst some brands invest a lot of money into instantly recognisable bespoke typefaces (Channel 4, The Guardian, Google) some choose a classic and run with it, to a point that it... read more